baked kale chips

Baked Kale Chips

Ingredients
1 large bunch of kale
1 teaspoon olive oil or coconut oil
1 teaspoon seasoning salt or sea salt
1 teaspoon pepper or Cajun seasoning

Cut the stems and spines off each kale leaf and discard. Wash the leaves and make sure they are thoroughly dry. One way to dry them is to lay them out in a single layer on paper towels

Preheat the oven to 350˚F. Line a large rimmed baking tray with parchment paper.

In a large bowl, put the washed and dried kale leaves. Add the oil and seasonings and toss gently. Spread the seasoned leaves in a single layer on the prepared baking tray. You may need to do this in two batches. Bake 10-15 minutes until the leaves turn dark green and become paper thin and dry.

Remove from the oven and let the kale chips cool in the pan on a wire rack, about 10 minutes. Repeat the process with the second batch of leaves. Eat when cool. If there are any chips left over store them in an air-tight canister. Delicious! They are like eating roasted Japanese nori seaweed leaves.

Variation

  • Instead of Cajun seasoning, sprinkle red pepper flakes to taste on the kale leaves.

shredded brussels sprouts

Brussels sprouts aren’t sexy and exciting but they are good for you. They are supposed to have cancer protection properties. They are also high in vitamin K, which aids in blood clotting,  and vitamin C, an antioxidant. But, you say, How does it taste? The answer is, Very similar to cabbage. So if you like cabbage then substitute shredded red and/or green cabbage.  Brussels sprouts can be bitter, especially if they have been overcooked. Overcooked sprouts turn a pale olive green. But this dish is stir-fried so there is little chance of it overcooking. If you cook a meat and two vegetables as I do for dinner, then I recommend leaving it for the last item on the menu to cook, then it will have your undivided attention.

Shredded Brussels Sprouts (adapted from allrecipes.com)

INGREDIENTS:
1/2 cup sliced bacon
1/2 cup peanuts (pine nuts in original recipe)
1 pound Brussels sprouts (about 2 cups)
3 green onions, minced
1 tablespoon water, optional
1/2 teaspoon seasoning salt (I used sea salt)
pepper to taste (I used Cajun seasoning)
soy sauce, optional

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Prepare the Brussels sprouts. Slice each head vertically. Place flat side down on the cutting board then shred the sprouts starting from the top and cutting until 1/2 inch is left of the stem. Discard the stem.
  2. Fry the bacon. Place bacon in a large, deep skillet. Cook over medium-high heat until crisp. Drain,reserving 2 tablespoons grease, crumble bacon, and set aside.
  3. Stir-fry the sprouts and serve. In the same skillet, heat reserved bacon grease over medium heat. Add nuts, and cook, stirring until browned. Add Brussels sprouts and green onions to the pan, and season with seasoning salt and pepper. If the Brussels sprouts look dry, add 1 tablespoon water. Cook over medium heat until sprouts are wilted and tender, 10 to 15 minutes or until the Brussels sprouts are bright green and crisp tender. Stir in crumbled bacon just before serving. If you wish, sprinkle a dash of soy sauce on top instead of adding more salt.

Variation

For a vegetarian side, omit the bacon and sauté the Brussels sprouts or cabbage in olive oil.

night of the spiderman

Spiderman the musical. What a concept. With Gotham City’s tilted perspectives, conflicted mutant superhero and super-evil villain, and great acrobatics mimicking computer generated special effects, this Spidey even got angst. Unlike another Gotham superhero, this one also got the girl.  There was never any doubt that the good guy would vanquish evil. It was great escapist fantasy for a couple of hours!

After we got back to the apartment I decided to make a post-show treat. Bulla! In Jamaica, a common shout on the playground was “yu get bulla!” meaning, zero, zip, zilch, nada, nothing. I got this recipe from Peter and Karen’s copy of Traditional Jamaican Cookery by Norma Benghiat (pronounced ben-gate). Besides a playground taunt, bulla is a quick bread made from flour and spices. It is always baked as a round loaf. I’ve begun to wonder if “bulla” is derived from the French boule which means “ball” and is a round loaf of bread.  It reminded me of an Irish soda bread and I wondered if this might be another ancestor of the bulla. Its etymology notwithstanding, this bulla came out dense, slightly sweet and delicately spicy.

3 cups flour plus extra for rolling and dusting
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon allspice
1 teaspoon grated ginger
3 tablespoons melted butter
1 /2 cup sugar dissolved in 1/2 cup water (originally 1:1)

Preheat oven to 375˚F. Melt a tablespoon of butter and add 1/2 tablespoon of flour. Use a pastry brush to apply the butter mixture to the bottom and sides of a 9″ round pan. If using a pan with a dark nonstick finish, reduce the heat to 350 and remove the bulla from the oven 5 minutes before cooking time is up.

In a large bowl, sift flour, baking powder, salt, nutmeg, allspice. Mix in ginger and  melted butter. Gradually add the sugar water to make a firm dough.

Knead the dough until the sides of the bowl are clean and the ball of dough not sticky. Roll out dough on lightly floured board until it is 1/2 inch thick. Roll the dough into a 9” circle. Dust both sides lightly with flour. Put the dough in the prepared pan and bake 25-30 minutes or until a tester inserted in the center comes out clean.

Eat the bulla warm with butter and jam.

yogurt marinated chicken skewers with harissa

My friend Thavida suggested I try harissa. I didn’t know what it was so I did a search on the internet. It is a roasted red pepper sauce from North Africa. It is mixed with spices and served with grilled meats. Since I prefer to cook low fat, which can get boring, for how many ways can you grill/broil/bake a chicken breast? Dipping sauces help alleviate the boredom and keep me seated at the table, savoring each mouthful.

I adapted this recipe from the food network.com and served it with Thai cucumber salad, baked spaghetti squash, and baked plantain. It’s eclectic but I like mixing things up. The cucumber was cool and the dressing slightly sweet with the crunch of peanuts and onion. The plantain was vaguely sweet, and so was the squash, liberally buttered and sprinkled with brown sugar, salt and pepper. The harissa itself was mild tasting, tangy but not oily, with overtones of cumin. I’d up the chilies the next time I make this.

Yogurt Marinated Chicken Skewers with Harissa

Ingredients

1/4 cup whole milk yogurt
1 (1 to 2-inch) knob fresh ginger, peeled and grated
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon red chili flakes
Kosher salt
2 boneless skinless chicken breasts cut into 1 inch chunks
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 lemon, halved
Harissa, recipe follows

Preparation

In a large bowl, combine the yogurt, ginger, cumin, chili flakes and salt. Whisk until smooth and pour into a baking dish. Lay the chicken halves, skin side up, in the yogurt mixture. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for a couple of hours to marinate. Do not marinate longer than 2 hours for the yogurt will “cook” the chicken.

Remove the chicken from the yogurt, leaving any excess behind. Thread the chunks onto metal skewers, about 4-5 per skewer. Broil or grill the chicken skewers until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the chunks registers between 155 degrees F and 160 degrees F, about 5-10 minutes.

Transfer chicken to a serving platter and sprinkle with lemon juice. Top with harissa and serve immediately.

Harissa

2 teaspoons coriander seeds
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1 teaspoon caraway seeds
2 tablespoons paprika
1 teaspoon red chili flakes
3 cloves garlic, peeled
1 red bell pepper, roasted, peeled and seeded (I used half a jar of roasted peppers, drained)
Sea salt
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to coat the top of the harissa

In a small bowl, combine the coriander seeds, cumin seeds and caraway seeds. Add the spices to a small saucepan and heat for 1 to 2 minutes. You should faintly detect the scent of the spices. Remove the pan from the heat and set aside to cool. Add the paprika and chili flakes to the spice mix.

Using a mortar and pestle (or, alternatively, a food processor) grind the garlic cloves until they become a paste, then add the red bell pepper. Season with salt, to taste, then add the spices and the 2 tablespoons of extra-virgin olive oil and blend well. When blended, transfer the harissa to a container and top with some additional olive oil. This will keep for 3 to 6 weeks, covered, in the refrigerator.

Yield: 1/2 cup

I adapted this recipe for Thai Cucumber Salad from Allrecipes.com. It has a mild flavor that cools the palate. The jalapeño pepper is very mild, so if you want a spicier version use Thai chilies instead.

Thai Cucumber Salad (Allrecipes.com)

Ingredients

1 large cucumber, peeled, halved lengthwise, seeded, and cut into 1/4-inch slices
1 tablespoon salt
1/4 cup white sugar
1/4 cup unseasoned rice wine vinegar (Use white vinegar if rice wine vinegar isn’t available)
1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and chopped
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
1/2 shallot or red onion, halved and sliced
1/4 cup chopped or whole peanuts (I recommend roasted unsalted peanuts)

Preparation

1. Toss the cucumbers with the salt in a colander, and leave in the sink to drain for 30 minutes. Rinse with cold water, then drain and pat dry with paper towels.

2. Whisk together the sugar and vinegar in a mixing bowl until the sugar has dissolved. Add the cucumbers, jalapeno peppers, cilantro, and onion; toss to combine. Sprinkle chopped/whole peanuts on top before serving.

It’s gai yang, but where’s the khao neow and somtam?

We’ve been good, AJ and I. Since we’ve been back in New York City on the low carb-low fat diet we haven’t had skin, chicken skin that is, for the last four months. It was time for a treat. I figured if I’m going to break the diet, then I should make it worthwhile. I decided to make  gai yang or roast chicken, Thai style, because I found this recipe on America’s Test Kitchen. It didn’t disappoint; the flavors were authentic, the chicken juicy. It just wasn’t fiery enough!

Purists will know that gai yang is traditionally served with papaya salad (somtam)and sticky rice (khao neow). Well, I  committed a heresy. Instead of papaya salad, we had a spinach, strawberry, and hearts of palm salad with lemon-poppy seed dressing. Instead of the sticky rice, I made stir-fried baby bok choy in garlic and ginger and seasoned it with Maggi sauce. Thus, I assuaged the guilt with some low calorie veggie sides.

The original recipe called for grilling on an outdoor barbecue. But since I live in a city apartment, I have parted ways from the original and broiled/baked the chicken instead. I have also added two chilies to the dipping sauce. What’s a dipping sauce without some heat?

Gai Yang or Thai Style Roast Chicken

Ingredients

Chicken and Brine

  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup table salt
  • 4 split bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts about 12 ounces each (I used 1 chicken breast and 2 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs)

Dipping Sauce

  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 3 small cloves garlic , minced or pressed through garlic press (1 1/2 teaspoons)
  • 1/4 cup distilled white vinegar
  • 1/4 cup lime juice from 2 to 3 limes
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 chilies, chopped (optional)

Rub

  • 12 medium cloves garlic , minced or pressed through garlic press (1/4 cup)
  • 1 piece fresh ginger (about 2 inches), minced (about 2 tablespoons)
  • 2 tablespoons ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons ground coriander
  • 2/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro leaves
  • 1/4 cup lime juice from 2 to 3 limes
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

Instructions

1. To brine the chicken: Dissolve sugar and salt in 2 quarts cold water in large container or bowl; submerge chicken in brine and refrigerate at least 30 minutes but not longer than 1 hour. Rinse chicken under cool running water and pat dry with paper towels.
2. For the dipping sauce: Whisk ingredients in small bowl until sugar dissolves. Let stand 1 hour at room temperature to allow flavors to meld.
3. To make and apply the rub: Combine all rub ingredients in small bowl; work mixture with fingers to thoroughly combine. Slide fingers between skin and meat to loosen skin, taking care not to detach skin. Rub about 2 tablespoons mixture under skin. Thoroughly rub even layer of mixture onto all exterior surfaces, including bottom and sides. Repeat with remaining chicken pieces. Place chicken in medium bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate while preparing grill.
4. To broil the chicken: Cover the broiling pan with foil for easy clean up. Spray with cooking spray. Place the chicken pieces skin side up and broil 10 minutes or until the skin is golden or blackened. Turn the heat to 350˚F and put the pan in the oven to finish cooking, about 15-20 minutes or until the chicken reaches an internal temperature of 165˚F  160˚F on an instant read thermometer.

Anne Marie’s broiled fish topped with panko breadcrumbs

I wish I could invent recipes like my cousin Anne Marie. She created this crunchy flavorful fish fillet that takes less than 15 minutes to prep and broil. So I am adding this to a new category I call Quick and Easy. Anne Marie didn’t have any measurements and it really is so simple you don’t need any:

Use any white fish filet.  Rinse, pat dry and put skin side down in your broiling pan.   Sprinkle with lemon or lime juice and smear mayonnaise lightly over the top.  Season with seasoned salt, black pepper, garlic, thyme, dill & crushed red peppers.  Top with the panko bread crumbs, pressing them lightly into the fish and dusting with paprika   Place in broiler for approximately 4 minutes on each side.

I used a Cajun seasoning in place of the seasoned salt on two basa fish fillets and omitted the paprika. I left the fillets in the broiler for only 4 minutes. It was crispy on the outside and flaky, moist, and tender on the inside. It didn’t need any additional salt.

basil chicken in coconut curry sauce

When a dish “needs something” the cooks in my family (the Jamaican side, that is) always say, “Put  a country pepper in-a de pot!” When I tried this dish from Simply Recipes for dinner, I thought it was light and delicious, but it definitely needed a country pepper. What we call a country pepper is also called a Scotch Bonnet. Its close relative is the Habañero. I took the last Habañero out of  the freezer and put that into the sauce. Now a Scotch Bonnet/Habañero will add some heat but mostly it will add flavor to the dish.

You can tell I’m so used to the vivid flavors of Jamaica and Thailand, and even though I added the country pepper,  I still wasn’t happy with the sauce.  I could hear a voice in my head say “sai nam pla!” So I added some fish sauce to the curry. Fish sauce or nam pla is pungent but it  adds saltiness and flavor without changing the color of the sauce, thus making it ideal for this light curry.

Some compromises in favor of “lite” cooking. To lighten the calorie load of this dish I used “lite” coconut milk. White rice is best to serve with curry sauces because it soaks up the sauce. However, brown rice won’t do this.  So instead of a traditional white rice accompaniment to this curry dish, I made a medley; a mix of white Thai jasmine (hom mali) rice and brown basmati. Both were the long grain varieties. The ratio is 1 cup white to 2 cups brown rice.

Basil Chicken in Coconut Curry Sauce

INGREDIENTS

1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon chili powder
1/4 teaspoon turmeric

1 lb skinless, boneless chicken thighs or breast (2 thighs or 1 large breast)

1 large red onion, chopped (about 1 cup)
5 cloves garlic, minced
1 large whole country pepper (Scotch Bonnet or Habañero) (2 jalapeño peppers in original recipe)
2 Tablespoons olive oil, grapeseed oil, or canola oil
1 14-oz can lite coconut milk
2 teaspoons cornstarch
1 teaspoon Thai fish sauce or Worcestershire sauce, to taste
3 Tablespoon fresh basil leaves, chopped
1 Tablespoon finely chopped fresh ginger

Hot cooked rice

METHOD

1 In a small bowl, mix together the salt, ground coriander, cumin, ground cloves, cinnamon, ground cardamom, black pepper, chili powder, and turmeric. Set aside.

2 Rinse chicken, pat dry. Cut into 1-inch pieces. Put into a bowl and sprinkle the spice mix over all the pieces. Coat well and let sit for 30 minutes at room temperature or in the refrigerator for 1 to 2 hours.

3 In a large skillet heat 1 Tablespoon oil on medium high heat. Add the onions and country pepper and cook for 3 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute more. Remove the onions, pepper and garlic from the pan and put into a medium sized bowl. Set aside. Use the same pan for the next step.

4 Add 1 Tablespoon oil to the skillet and heat on medium high heat. Add one half of the chicken pieces, spreading them out on the pan so they are not crowded. Brown for a few minutes on each side. When the chicken pieces are cooked through, and no pink remains, remove from pan, add to the bowl with the onions. Cook the second batch of chicken pieces the same way. Remove from pan, add to bowl with onions.

5 Add the coconut milk, minus a couple tablespoons, to the skillet. In a small bowl, mix the remaining coconut with the corn starch to dissolve the corn starch. Add the corn starch mixture back to the skillet with the coconut milk. Cook on medium heat and stir till thick and bubbly. Mix in the fish sauce or Worcestershire sauce. Add chicken mixture, basil, and ginger. Cook 2 minutes more to cook through.

Serve over rice. Serves 4.

I served basil chicken in coconut curry sauce with Stir-Fry Baby Bok Choy from about.com. Baby bok choy is sweeter and the stems thinner than the adult variety.

Stir-Fry Baby Bok Choy

Ingredients:

4 bunches baby bok choy (basically, 1 bunch per person)
2 slices ginger
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon sugar, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon salt, or to taste
1/4 cup water
A few drops sesame oil, optional
1 tablespoon vegetable oil for stir-frying

Preparation:

Wash the baby bok choy and drain. Separate the stalks and leaves. Cut the stalk diagonally and cut the leaves across.Trim the tips and the ends.

Heat wok and add oil. When oil is ready, add ginger and stir-fry briefly, for about 30 seconds, until the ginger is aromatic. Add the bok choy, adding the stalks first, and then the leaves. Stir in the soy sauce, sugar, and salt, and stir-fry1 on high heat for 1 minute.

Add the water, cover the wok and simmer for about 2 minutes. Stir in the sesame oil and serve. Serves 4.

chickpea cakes with tzatziki sauce

It was one of those nights where I had leftover sides but no main course. For a healthy dinner tonight I made this chickpea cake with tzatziki or cucumber sauce. I served it with the green apple-corn slaw left over from the grilled fish tacos, and some cannellini and green beans leftover from lunch. I love asparagus so I pan-roasted a bunch and served it with a dressing of tomatoes, garlic, and ripe olives. Simple and delicious!

Chickpea Cakes with Tzatziki Sauce (from America’s Test Kitchen)
Serves 6

Ingredients:

2 slices high-quality sandwich bread, torn into pieces (I used 2/3 cup Panko breadcrumbs and skipped Step 1)
1 cucumber, peeled and halved lengthwise, seeded and shredded
Salt
1 1/4 cups nonfat Greek yogurt
6 scallions, sliced thin
1/4 cup minced fresh cilantro
Black pepper
2 (15 oz) cans chickpeas, drained and rinsed
2 large eggs
3 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon olive oil
1 teaspoon garam masala (see Cook’s Note)
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 shallot, minced (about 3 tablespoons)
Lime wedges for serving (optional)

Preparation:

  1. Prepare to make the chickpea cakes. Adjust an oven rack to the middle position and heat the oven to 350˚F. Pulse the bread in a food processor to coarse crumbs, about 10 pulses. Do not wash the food processor bowl afterwards. Spread the crumbs on a rimmed baking sheet and bake, stirring occasionally, until golden brown and dry, 10-12 minutes. Let the crumbs cool to room temperature.
  2. Make the Tzatziki Sauce. Meanwhile, toss the cucumber with 1/2 teaspoon salt in a colander and let drain for 20 minutes. Combine the drained cucumber 3/4 cup of the yogurt, 2 tablespoons of the scallions, and 1 tablespoon of the cilantro in a bowl and season with salt and black pepper to taste.
  3. Make the chickpea patties. Pulse the chickpeas in the food processor to a coarse puree with large pieces remaining, about 8 pulses. In a medium bowl, whisk the eggs, 2 tablespoons of the oil, garam masala, cayenne, and 1/8 teaspoon salt together. Stir in the toasted bread crumbs, remaining 1/2 cup yogurt, remaining scallions, remaining 3 tablespoons cilantro, processed chickpeas, and shallot until just combined. Using a 1/3 cup measure, scoop the chickpea mixture and roll into balls. Flatten. Repeat.  This amount makes about 10-12 cakes.
  4. Cook the patties. Spray cooking spray in a 12 inch non-stick skillet and heat over medium heat until hot. Carefully lay half the cakes in the skillet and cook until well browned on both sides, 8-10 minutes, flipping them halfway through. Repeat.
  5. Serve. Transfer the cakes to a plate and tent loosely with foil. Serve with tzatziki sauce and lime wedges.

Cook’s Note: To make garam masala:  1/2 teaspoon ground coriander, 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, 1/8 teaspoon ground cardamom, and 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Per serving (1 cake plus 1/4 cup sauce): Cal 240; Fat 12g; Sat fat 2.5g; Chol 75mg; Carb 23g; Protein 12g; Fiber  5g; Sodium 610mg

mate chocolate tea with Jamaican bun and cheese

I had read about drinking chocolate tea to satisfy food cravings–especially the late-night kind! To me, anything chocolate is good. I noticed that a new gourmet spice and tea shop opened on Broadway called Spices and Tease (between 97th  and 98th Streets) so I wandered in to check it out. Maxim, the proprietor, introduced me to mate chocolate tea. It was his last stash for the next two weeks but he sold it to me. He promised me that it would get darker the longer it steeped but it would not get bitter. He’s right. It has the most wonderful guilt-free chocolate smell and a slight bitter taste reminiscent of dark chocolate. A mate (pronounced ma-teh) is a South American herbal tea made from the leaves of the yerba mate. And I discovered it’s a wonderful accompaniment to bun and cheese, an Easter tradition in Jamaica.

Speaking of which, my cousin Anne Marie contributed this recipe for a stout bun. She writes: “SweetPea LOVES this bun recipe which I got from my cousin Debbie, so I have not made it in several years because he tends to eat all but the one or two slices I manage to save for myself!!!  Sweetie says that if I don’t make it, he won’t be tempted but you know, I think I’ll surprise him with it next month for his 65th!!!!!!!!! Birthday.” So, as an added bonus, here is Anne Marie’s recipe for

Jamaican Spice Bun

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups dark brown sugar;
2 teaspoons melted butter;
2 teaspoons golden syrup or honey;
2 teaspoons mixed spice (cinnamon, nutmeg & mace in equal parts.  I made up a small jar to save myself the trouble for future buns);
1 cup of stout (I love Guinness);
3 cups all purpose flour;
3 tsp baking powder;
1 cup mixed glacé fruits (I add extra glacé cherries);
1 large egg (or 2 medium eggs)

Preparation

1.  Preheat oven to 400˚F
2.  In a small saucepan, dissolve sugar, butter, syrup/honey & spices in the stout on low heat
3.  Mix flour, baking powder and fruit
4.  Beat eggs & mix all ingredients together
5.  Put in greased and parchment lined (9×5 inch) loaf tin
6.  Bake approximately 1 hour

This recipe makes one loaf of spice bun. Sam, I hope Anne Marie makes this for your birthday next month– and for any other occasion.

grilled fish tacos

Grilled Fish Tacos (from: Joylicious at The Daily Meal)

It must be getting warmer for I am thinking of summertime grilling. However, I made this grilled fish taco dish in under one hour using my little George Foreman grill in a New York apartment. I used basa fillets though any white fish fillets will do. Joylicious recommends tilapia. The fish is accompanied with a  jicama slaw.  In Thailand the jicama is called man kaew, literally a “glass potato.” It is a  turnip shaped vegetable, crunchy, with a  lightly sweet flavor that’s refreshing. However, I couldn’t find jicama so I used a green apple instead. The second accompaniment is a yogurt remoulade. Now a rémoulade is a condiment usually made with aioli or mayonnaise, and often accompanies fish. This version is made with plain Greek style yogurt which is thicker, like a sour cream, and has less calories, I am sure.

Ingredients

For the green apple-corn slaw:

  • 1 fresh lime, squeezed
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • 1 1/2 cups  Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored, and diced small (jicama in the original recipe)
  • 3/4 cup red, orange,and green bell pepper, diced small
  • ¼ cup red onion, diced small
  • ¼ cup frozen corn, defrosted
  • ¼ cup green onion, diced small
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

For the yogurt rémoulade sauce:

  • 1 1/2 cups fat-free Greek style yogurt (I used Fage)
  • 1 teaspoon Cajun seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon  grain mustard
  • 1 teaspoon Sriracha chili sauce
  • ½ lime squeezed
  • Salt, to taste

For the fish:

  • 1 1/2 pounds basa fillets (or any white fish. It was tilapia in the original)
  • 2 tablespoons of Cajun seasoning
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 10 pack corn tortillas (I used yellow corn)
  • 1 cup green cabbage mix, thinly sliced, for garnish (purple and green cabbage mix in the original)
  • 1 avocado, for garnish (recommended!)
  • 1/2 cup cilantro leaves, for garnish
  • 1 lime, sliced into wedges, for garnish

Directions

Heat the grill, making sure it’s hot about 300-400 degrees.

Make the green apple-corn slaw. While you’re waiting for grill to heat up, start prepping the slaw. In a large bowl whisk together lime juice, sesame seeds and honey together. Then toss mixture with green apple, bell peppers, onion, corn, and green onion.  Use salt and pepper to adjust your desired taste (adding only ½ teaspoon at a time) – adding more honey and lime if needed to balance out the sweetness and tartness.

Make the remoulade sauce. In a medium bowl mix the yogurt, seasoning, mustard, Sriracha saucee, and lime juice together. Salt to desired taste.

Grill the fish fillets. Drizzle fish fillets with oil and evenly sprinkle each side with Cajun seasoning, adding more if needed. I grilled the fillets in the George Foreman, which doesn’t need any oil. It only took 4 minutes to grill. You can check for doneness when the fillet is white all the way through and the juices from the fish run clear. Set aside when done.

Serve. I heated up each corn tortilla in a skillet according to the package directions. Do keep tortillas warm by wrapping them in a towel until ready to serve. To serve,  start with a warm tortilla,  layering it with the cabbage mix, then pile a generous heaping of fillet topped with the green-apple corn slaw, avocado, and a generous dollop of rémoulade sauce. Finish with cilantro and a squeeze of lime.

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