broccoli-tomato and shrimp fritters

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Shrimp fritters are a Jamaican appetizer and snack. At home, we eat them with hot Scotch Bonnet peppers cooked in the batter. I’ve added broccoli and tomato to the recipe; the broccoli adds crunch and colour, and the tomato adds colour and moisture. Without the shrimp, this is a vegetarian treat. Just increase the broccoli to 6 cups.

Broccoli Tomato and Shrimp Fritters

Yield: 11-12 three-inch fritters

12 ounces fresh broccoli (3 cups chopped)
500 g frozen and thawed shrimp, chopped
2 large eggs
1 cup (120 g) all-purpose flour
1 medium tomato, chopped and seeded
2/3 cup finely grated parmesan cheese (or mix 1/3 Parmesan and 1/3 Romano cheeses), optional
2-4 cloves garlic, minced (use more or less if you prefer)
1 teaspoon coarse salt, plus more to taste
1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon of red pepper flakes, optional, OR
1 Scotch Bonnet pepper, finely chopped, with seeds for added heat or without seeds for less (optional)
1/4 cup cream or nonfat milk, more or less as needed to add cohesion to the batter
Vegetable oil for frying

To prepare the broccoli, cut the florets from the stems. With a vegetable peeler, peel off the tough outer coating of the stems. Chop stems roughly into 1/2 inch pieces. Separate the florets into 1 inch pieces.

Fill a large pot with about 3 inches of water and bring to a boil. Add about a teaspoon of salt to the water. Add the broccoli. Cook 5-6 minutes or until tender. The broccoli will be a bright green color. Drain the broccoli in a colander and rinse under cold water to set the color and stop the cooking process. Pulse the broccoli in a food processor 2-4 times. Broccoli should still be chunky and not too small.

In a large bowl, beat the eggs. Add the flour, tomato, cheese(s), garlic, salt, black pepper, and pepper flakes or Scotch Bonnet pepper, if using. Add the broccoli. Use a large wooden spoon to mix all the ingredients together. Add the cream or milk if the batter doesn’t clump together when dropped from the spoon.

Cook’s Note: The tomato not only adds a pop of color but it also adds moisture to the fritter—a little trick I learned from my cousin Cathy!

Pour enough oil in 10-inch non-stick skillet to cover the bottom. Heat oil on medium heat until the pan sizzles when a drop of water is sprinkled in it. Using a 1/4 cup dry measure, scoop up the broccoli batter and carefully drop it in the hot skillet. Flatten slightly with a fork. Continue scooping, flattening, and frying fritters, about 3 at a time. Leave about 2 inches between each fritter. Fry on one side 3-5 minutes or until golden brown, then flip, and fry 1-2 minutes on the second side. Add more oil as needed.

Cook’s Note: Dip the 1/4 cup measure in water to ensure the batter releases as you scoop the batter into the skillet.

Transfer fritters to a paper towel lined serving plate. If the fritters won’t be eaten right away, they can be kept in a low oven. Serve these fritters with tzatziki sauce, lemon-garlic yogurt, or Sriracha-pickle mayonnaise. To make lemon-garlic yogurt, to one cup of Greek style yogurt, add fresh lemon juice and lemon zest to taste. For a garlic flavor, add minced garlic. Season with salt and pepper to taste. For Sriracha-pickle mayonnaise, put a 1/3 cup mayonnaise in a small bowl with about 2 teaspoons chopped pickle (more or less to taste). Add the Sriracha sauce to taste. If you haven’t got Sriracha sauce, use any red hot sauce like Tabasco.

brown rice thai curry chicken lettuce wraps

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This was originally a vegan recipe but because Andy likes meat, I made the wraps with chicken instead. It’s actually a rice salad that’s eaten with lettuce.

Brown Rice Thai Curry Chicken Lettuce Wraps (adapted from Vegan8)

For the Golden Curry Rice
1/2 cup (106 g) brown jasmine rice
1 1/4 cup (300 g) water
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
1/2 tablespoon (4 g) yellow curry powder
2 teaspoons fresh lime juice

For the Thai Curry Chicken
1 packed cup (140 g) finely chopped white onion
2 long medium carrots (154 g) diced into 1/4 inch pieces
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt, plus another 1/4 teaspoon later
1/2 cup water
2 teaspoons yellow curry powder
2 tablespoons red curry paste (I recommend a Thai brand such as Lobo)
1/2-1 tablespoon fresh lime juice (depending on how strong you like it)
2 cups chopped chicken tenders seasoned with salt and pepper and 2 teaspoons cornstarch, mixed together
3 teaspoons brown sugar, optional
1/4-1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
large romaine lettuce leaves

Thai Curry Lime Dipping Sauce
3 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons lime juice
3 tablespoons brown sugar, more or less to taste
2 tablespoons red curry paste
2 teaspoons grated onion
1 teaspoon garlic, minced
1/8 teaspoon salt

Instructions
1. Add all the ingredients for the curry rice to a rice cooker. If the rice isn’t tender, add a bit more water to the rice cooker and cook again until the grains are cooked but still firm. Set aside.

2. Cook the chicken in a little oil in a large saucepan over medium high heat until no longer pink. Remove from heat and set aside. Add the onions, carrots, just the 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/2 cup water to the empty pan over medium heat. Stir the veggies well and as soon as it comes to a simmer, cover with a lid and cook for 10 minutes. If the water dries out, add a bit more.

2. Remove from the heat and add the cooked chicken, curry powder, red curry paste, lime juice, remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, sugar, if using. Stir and turn the heat to low. Cook for just a couple of minutes until heated through. Taste and add any more salt if needed. It should be spicy.

3. For the Thai Curry Lime Sauce, mix all of the ingredients in a small pot with a whisk. Turn to medium heat and cook for just a couple of minutes to heat through and dissolve the sugar. It should be spicy and slightly sweet.

4. Combine rice and chicken mixture. Spoon onto a lettuce leaf, then drizzle on Curry Lime Sauce and garnish with cilantro. Eat!

vietnamese summer rolls

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This is another recipe from the cookbook I got recently. Summer rolls are an appetizer made with rice paper, a brittle opaque circle of rice flour dough that must be softened until it turns transparent. It’s then filled with cooked shrimp, Chinese roast pork, and rice vermicelli.I bought the rice paper but I made my own roast pork. Roast pork can be bought at shops in Chinatown. I had bean threads on hand so I used that instead of the vermicelli.  After trial and error, I found that the rice paper shouldn’t be completely softened or they become too difficult to handle, but the vermicelli/bean threads can be left to soak as long as possible until they become soft; the softer the better. Unlike spring rolls that are always deep fried, summer rolls are eaten fresh. As you can see from the progression in the picture, I got better at rolling once I found the secret about the rice paper.

Vietnamese Summer Rolls (adapted from Chinese Cooking and More)
Makes 12 rolls
Prep time: 45 minutes

Vietnamese dipping sauce (recipe follows)
1/2 pound medium raw shrimp, peeled and deveined
3 1/2 ounces rice vermicelli (can substitute bean threads)
12 rice paper wrappers, about 6 inches in diameter
36 whole fresh cilantro leaves
1/4 pound Chinese roast pork, sliced 1/8 inch thick (recipe follows)
1 tablespoon chopped peanuts
lime peel, optional

1.You can buy red roast pork or make your own. To make your own, marinate the pork tenderloin one night before then bake it the next day. Remove from oven to cool.
2.Prepare the Vietnamese dipping sauce and set aside.
3.Bring large saucepan of water to a boil over high heat. Add shrimp. Simmer 1-2 minutes or until the shrimp are pink and opaque. Remove shrimp with a slotted spoon to a small bowl. When cool, slice shrimp in half lengthwise.
4.Soften vermicelli or bean threads in a medium bowl of hot water 20-30 minutes. Drain, and cut noodles into 3 inch lengths.
5.Soften rice paper wrappers one at a time in a large bowl of warm water 30-40 seconds or until just pliable. Drain wrappers one at a time on a kitchen towel then transfer to a work surface.

Cook’s Note: If the wrapper is too soft, it will curl over on itself and it will be very hard to straighten out. So soak each wrapper until it just softens; it’s okay if the edges are slightly stiff. My work surface was a kitchen towel because I found the wrapper stuck to the paper towel. I also found that the wrapper continued to soften while it was stretched out on the kitchen towel.

6.Arrange 3 cilantro leaves in the center of the wrapper, layer with 2 shrimp halves, 2 pork slices and about 4 tablespoons the rice vermicelli/bean threads.

7.Fold bottom of wrapper up over filling. Fold in each side then roll up. Repeat steps #5 and #6.
8.Just before serving sprinkle with chopped peanuts. Garnish with lime peel if desired. Serve with Vietnamese dipping sauce.

Vietnamese Dipping Sauce: Combine 1/2 cup water, 1/4 cup fish sauce, 2 tablespoons lime juice, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 clove minced garlic and 1/4 teaspoon chili oil in a small bowl and mix well. Makes 1 cup.

Homemade Chinese Roast Pork (CBT Lee)
I’ve been making this recipe for years; it’s very good Chinese restaurant quality. It can be made a day before assembling the rolls then refrigerated until ready to use.
Prep time: 10 minutes
Resting time: 3-6 hours, preferably overnight
Cooking time: 35-40 minutes

2 lb pork tenderloin
2 tablespoons brown bean sauce
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1/2 cup chicken stock or water
1 tablespoon salt
2 tablespoons light soy sauce
1/4 cup light brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon 5 spice powder
1 tablespoon dry sherry
1/4 teaspoon red food coloring

Mash brown bean sauce with a fork. Combine mashed beans and remaining ingredients in a small pot. Heat just to dissolve sugar. Pour marinade over pork. Let stand 3-6 hours in the refrigerator, turning occasionally. Bake at 350˚F/175˚C 35-40 minutes or until it reaches an internal temperature of 165˚F on an instant read thermometer. Slice and serve.

the joy of eating

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I’ve been thinking all week about the pohpia, the fresh spring rolls at Coffee Bean by Dao, Paradise Park. They are a mouthful of minced pork, shrimp, noodles, and fresh basil chiffonade all wrapped up in a chewy rice noodle wrap, then sprinkled with a spicy green chili nam jim dipping sauce. Just pop the whole thing in your mouth. The first bite is spicy, and then you chew, chew chew, and your tongue wraps around  the shrimp, the pork, the noodles,  and the sharp fresh taste of basil. It’s comfort food that soothes the senses, and if you feel even the slightest bit guilty, don’t.

thai grilled beef salad (yum neua)

DSC02049 Thai Grilled Beef Salad (America’s Test Kitchen) America’s Test Kitchen has come up with another adaptation of a Thai recipe that tastes authentic. Even my husband says so, and for a Thai, that is true praise indeed. I was aiming for the beef to be undercooked  because putting it in the sauce after grilling cooks it further. It’s a combination of resting plus the lime juice that completes the cooking, I think. This salad serving suggestion is with cucumber, which lessens the heat of the chile. You can also serve it with tomato slices. Another idea is to plate the salad on shredded lettuce or serve it with lettuce on the side to made steak “sandwiches.” The Test Kitchen folks say to pass the paprika-cayenne and roasted rice at table, but this is never done in Thailand. Yum Neua always arrives at table ready to eat, juicy tender meat in a sauce that’s a perfect balance of sour, salty, minty and spicy. Prep time: 30 minutes Cook time: 5 minutes Serves 4 to 6 Ingredients 1 teaspoon sweet paprika 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 tablespoon white rice (You’ll only use 1/2 tablespoon. I used roasted rice available in small jars at Asian groceries) 3 tablespoons lime juice (2 limes) 2 tablespoons fish sauce 2 tablespoons water 1/2 -1 teaspoon sugar 1 (1 1/2 pound) flank steak, trimmed (I couldn’t find flank steak so I bought London broil instead) Salt and white pepper, coarsely ground 4 shallots, sliced thin 1 1/2cups fresh mint leaves, sliced into slivers 1 1/2cups fresh cilantro leaves, minced 1 Thai chile, stemmed and sliced thin into rounds 1 seedless English cucumber, sliced 1/4 inch thick on bias Instructions

  1. Heat paprika and cayenne in 8-inch skillet over medium heat; cook, shaking pan, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Transfer to small bowl. You will only use 1/4 teaspoon of the paprika mixture. Put up the leftover for another day.
  2. [Cook’s Note: Skip this step if you have roasted rice in a jar] Return now-empty skillet to medium-high heat, add rice, and toast, stirring frequently, until deep golden brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer to second small bowl and cool for 5 minutes. Grind rice with spice grinder, mini food processor, or mortar and pestle until it resembles fine meal, 10 to 30 seconds (you should have about 1 tablespoon rice powder).
  3. Whisk lime juice, fish sauce, water, 1/2 teaspoon sugar, and 1/4 teaspoon toasted paprika mixture in large bowl. Taste. If too sour, add another 1/2 teaspoon sugar and set aside. Lightly salt and pepper the steak.
  4. ATK’s directions FOR A CHARCOAL GRILL: Open bottom vent completely. Light large chimney starter filled with charcoal briquettes (6 quarts). When top coals are partially covered with ash, pour evenly over half of grill. Set cooking grate in place, cover, and open lid vent completely. Heat grill until hot, about 5 minutes. Place steak over hot part of grill and cook until beginning to char and beads of moisture appear on outer edges of meat, 5 to 6 minutes. Flip steak and continue to cook on second side until charred and center registers 125 degrees, about 5 minutes longer.
  5. ATK’s directions FOR A GAS GRILL: Turn all burners to high, cover, and heat grill until hot, about 15 minutes. Leave primary burner on high and turn off other burner(s). Place steak over hot part of grill and cook until beginning to char and beads of moisture appear on outer edges of meat, 5 to 6 minutes. Flip steak and continue to cook on second side until charred and center registers 125 degrees, about 5 minutes longer.
  6. Foodie Joanie’s directions for an indoor grill: On my George Foreman grill, I found that 5 minutes was too long. The meat came out medium-well done and I wanted it medium rare. I recommend 2-3 minutes instead.
  7. Transfer to plate, tent loosely with aluminum foil, and let rest for 5 to 10 minutes before slicing.
  8. Slice meat against the grain  into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Transfer sliced steak to bowl with fish sauce mixture. Add shallots, mint, cilantro, chile, and 1/2 tablespoon rice powder; toss to combine. Transfer to platter lined with cucumber slices. Serve, passing remaining rice powder and toasted paprika mixture separately.  I forgot the cucumbers and served this dish with two old favorites–sesame rice and tom khaa or coconut milk soup— and one new favorite, Thai cabbage salad.

deviled eggs with sharp cheddar cheese

Let’s face it; it’s summer and it’s hot and you don’t want to spend a lot of time in the kitchen! Deviled eggs are another easy breakfast meal. Deviled eggs also make a great snack or appetizer. They really do not need additional salt or seasoning because I put in sharp cheddar cheese, a bit of mayonnaise, and Sriracha hot sauce.

Deviled Eggs
5 hard boiled eggs, peeled and sliced in half
1 tablespoon mayonnaise
1/3 cup sharp cheddar cheese, shredded
Sriracha sauce to taste
Cilantro or scallion, minced, for garnish if desired

Put the eggs in a small saucepan and cover with cool water. Cover and bring to a boil over medium heat, about 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and let the eggs sit in the hot water for 10 more minutes. Drain the eggs in the saucepan. Move the pan back and forth so that the motion cracks the egg shells. Hold the pan under the faucet and run cool water over the cracked eggs in the pan. Let the eggs rest in cool water until they are cool enough to handle. Change the water once or twice. Peel the cooled hard boiled eggs and slice in half vertically.

Carefully scoop the cooked yolks into a small bowl without tearing the egg whites. Using a pastry blender, cut the yolks fine. Add the mayonnaise and the cheese and continue blending. Add Sriracha to taste. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. If the yolk mixture is dry add a teaspoon more of mayonnaise.  The yolk mixture should be the consistency of a thick paste. Using a rubber/silicone spatula, scoop the yolk mixture out of the bowl and into a plastic bag. Snip off one corner. Squeeze the yolk mixture out of the snipped end into the bowl of each egg white. Garnish with scallion or cilantro, if you wish. Enjoy!

baked kale chips

Baked Kale Chips

Ingredients
1 large bunch of kale
1 teaspoon olive oil or coconut oil
1 teaspoon seasoning salt or sea salt
1 teaspoon pepper or Cajun seasoning

Cut the stems and spines off each kale leaf and discard. Wash the leaves and make sure they are thoroughly dry. One way to dry them is to lay them out in a single layer on paper towels

Preheat the oven to 350˚F. Line a large rimmed baking tray with parchment paper.

In a large bowl, put the washed and dried kale leaves. Add the oil and seasonings and toss gently. Spread the seasoned leaves in a single layer on the prepared baking tray. You may need to do this in two batches. Bake 10-15 minutes until the leaves turn dark green and become paper thin and dry.

Remove from the oven and let the kale chips cool in the pan on a wire rack, about 10 minutes. Repeat the process with the second batch of leaves. Eat when cool. If there are any chips left over store them in an air-tight canister. Delicious! They are like eating roasted Japanese nori seaweed leaves.

Variation

  • Instead of Cajun seasoning, sprinkle red pepper flakes to taste on the kale leaves.

Caribbean island lime shrimp

I have a pet peeve when I talk about the Caribbean.

The word is Car-rib-bee-an, not Ca-rib-bee-an. I’m from the Caribbean but I’ve never had this dish before. Despite its dubious provenance (about.com), I can say that it was not bad at all; unusually sweet, salty, spicy, tart, and sour–which surprises the mouth rather like the first time one eats Pad Thai. One thing I don’t understand is why a recipe calls for alcohol and then notes you can leave it out. Since I don’t drink, I don’t have alcohol on hand, so I was happy to leave it out.

INGREDIENTS:
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup fresh lime juice (about 2 limes)
1/2 cup orange juice concentrate
1/8 cup tequila, about half a mini-bottle (optional)
1 tablespoon Triple Sec or Cointreau orange liqueur, about half a mini-bottle (optional)
1/4 cup cilantro, chopped
2 cloves garlic, pressed
1/4 cup minced sweet onion
1/2 teaspoon curry powder
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or more to taste
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 to 1-1/2 pounds fresh shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails left on for presentation if you wish

PREPARATION:
Measure 1/4 cup olive oil, lime juice, orange juice concentrate, tequila (if using), Triple Sec (if using), cilantro, garlic, sweet onion, curry powder, salt, turmeric, cumin, cayenne pepper, and black pepper into a large zip-top bag. Seal and squish contents to mix. Add shrimp to marinade, squeeze out all the air, and seal. Turn bag to coat shrimp. Refrigerate for 1 hour. (Do not over-marinate or the citrus acids will “cook” the shrimp.)

Heat a large heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil to the hot pan and swirl to coat. Remove shrimp from marinade, reserving marinade, and place in a single layer in the hot pan. Cook for 1 minute, then flip the shrimp to the other side. Do not overcook the shrimp or it will become rubbery. Add the reserved marinade to the pan. Cook 1 minute, then remove shrimp and keep warm. Continue cooking the marinade until it reduces two-thirds to a thick sauce. Turn off the heat, return the shrimp to the pan, and toss in the sauce.

Cook’s note: If using medium shrimp (31 per pound), don’t cook for 2 minutes. Cook for 1 minute then remove from the pan. To cook all the shrimp at the same time, and to prevent overcooking, I turned off the heat while putting them in the pan. It’s important to work quickly so don’t be squeamish;  stick your hand in the bag and grab a handful of shrimp and sprinkle them in the oil. That’s why it’s safer with the heat off.

Serve Caribbean Island Lime Shrimp over white rice. Another serving idea, and low calorie too, is to serve it with romaine lettuce leaves. This dish is also good as a room temperature appetizer for parties. I made this dish last night so other good accompaniments are roasted yams (American sweet potato–yam in the Caribbean is a different vegetable), and of course,  the strawberry, spinach, hearts of palm salad.

Yield: 4 servings

Baked Spring Rolls with Spicy Dipping Sauce

I bought the Low Fat No Fat Thai cookbook (Lorenz Books, 2006) from Asia Books here in Bangkok last week. I tried two recipes so far,  and this is one of them. Unfortunately, these recipes are not kitchen-tested and I’m not quite sure the nutrition facts are trustworthy either. If I followed this recipe exactly, these baked spring rolls are supposed to be 46 calories each. But since I fooled around with the ingredients, that figure is not valid anyway. What I liked about this version of spring rolls is that it is baked, not fried. Though the result was chewy rather than crisp,  AJ asked for more. They weren’t bad. They even  look authentic.

When I make spring rolls, I use whatever ingredients are on hand. Some ingredients I’ve found that are just delicious are Chinese cabbage (Napa is recommended though regular cabbage, shredded in a food processor, will do nicely), scallions, tofu (firm, sliced into thin strips), bean sprouts, and shiitake mushrooms. If you like meat inside them, add a cup or cooked ground beef, chicken or pork, and a cup of cooked shredded crabmeat or cooked chopped shrimp. Notice I emphasize the word cooked. This cookbook neglected to mention that step in the Cha Gio or Vietnamese spring roll recipe but added that step in the Thai Spring Roll recipe. Having made spring rolls before, I knew that the meats have to be cooked before assembling the rolls or you run into the dangers of undercooked food.

Now, what, you may ask, is the difference between Chinese and Thai spring rolls? Well, very little, I should say, since the Thai borrowed the recipe from the Chinese and made it their own. The only technical difference is that the Thai roll their spring rolls in a cigar shape and of course,  like to serve them with sweet and spicy dipping sauces, whereas the Chinese prefer sweet and sour with mustard on the side.

1 cup or 1 bundle vermicelli (also called bean threads; fresh is preferred)
1 cup cloud ear mushrooms (fresh is preferred), chopped
1 cup ground pork, cooked, drained, and cooled slightly
1/2 cup grated carrot
salt and pepper to taste
sweet chili dipping sauce, optional (available from Asian supermarkets)

Egg wash
1 egg white
1 teaspoon rice bran oil (substitute sunflower or canola)
1 teaspoon water

1 package Chinese spring rolls (available from Asian supermarkets) 20-24 per package. The recipe above will make about 20 rolls.

Prepare the ingredients. If using dried vermicelli and dried cloud ear mushrooms, soak them separately in warm water for 30 minutes. Drain the bean threads and snip with kitchen scissors to 2 inch lengths. Drain the cloud ear mushrooms and chop.

Preheat the oven to 400˚F. Line a baking tray with parchment or silicone mat.


Fill the wrappers. In a large bowl, combine vermicelli, mushrooms, pork, and carrot. Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Fill a small bowl with water. To make a spring roll, separate two wrappers at a time from the package. One will tear but two will  not. Then separate the two. Spread one wrapper on the work surface and add two spoonfuls of filling. Spread it out, lengthwise. Fold up the bottom and then the sides. Roll up the wrapper. Dip your finger in the water, moisten the remaining edge, and seal. Place seam side down on a plate and continue peeling, filling, folding, and rolling.

Cook’s Tip: Dip your finger in the water and moisten the sides of the wrapper too. Fold up the bottom and then the two sides. The sides will stick together and will make it easier to roll up the wrapper.

Bake. Combine ingredients for the egg wash in a small bowl. Using a pastry brush, brush the cylinders and ends of each spring roll with the egg wash. Turn to be sure each roll is thoroughly coated. Transfer to prepared baking tray. Bake 25 minutes, turning once halfway through baking.

Serve. Spring rolls should be served immediately with dipping sauces. Usually one is sweet and spicy and the other is spicy and sour. The chilies for the dipping sauce are traditionally pounded in a mortar and pestle.  A food processor will not achieve the same consistency but here’s a trick. Instead, I froze the chilies and rinsed them in cold water to defrost them. Then I chopped up the chilies and smashed them with the flat of a large knife, dragging the blade across them. I did this a few more times until the texture of the chilies was coarse.

View the Smilebox collage below for wrapping and rolling the spring rolls and making the nam jihm  dipping sauce.

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hummus from leftovers

Sounds weird? I had made grilled chicken breasts for dinner last week with a chickpea and diced tomato sauce. We ate the chicken but had 2 cups of sauce left over. In this Teeny Tiny Kitchen I try not to waste food unless it is truly inedible. I felt that in another iteration, we could eat these leftovers. So I drained it and put it in the food processor along with the ingredients for this hummus recipe from America’s Test Kitchen’s Light and Healthy cookbook. This hummus has a nutty flavor with a slight bite from the cayenne, and because I didn’t process it into a smooth paste, it had a beany chewy texture which I liked. I left out the oil because the tomatoes and the lemon juice provided enough liquid and flavor.

1 (15 oz) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
5 tablespoons water
1/4 cup tahini
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 1/2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1/2 -1 small garlic clove, minced (I like garlic!)
Salt
1/8 teaspoon ground cumin
Pinch cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon minced fresh cilantro

  1. Process all ingredients except the cilantro in a food processor until smooth, 1-1 1/2 minutes.
  2. Scrape into a bowl.  Season with salt to taste and sprinkle with the cilantro before serving.  Season with additional lemon juice, salt, and cayenne to taste, if desired.
  3. Eat with cut raw vegetables such as baby cut carrots, cauliflower and broccoli florets,  and cucumber sticks.

Per 1/4 cup serving: Cal 100; Fat 7g; Sat fat 1g; Chol 0mg; Carb 7g; Protein 3g; Fiber 2g; Sodium 260mg